Walking Through Life God's Way

Monday, March 17, 2014

Breathing in and Breathing out!


Acts of the Apostles reveals the passion of the early Christians for continuing what Jesus Christ had started in his earthly ministry (Acts 1.1). These early believers demonstrated a devotion that sparked radical transformation in their worldview during the days following Pentecost. A question arises: “What was the newly discovered passion that encouraged their change?” In the following pages, I seek to examine Acts 2.42 as supporting the presumption that the “devotion” of the early believers was the means by which radical transformation took place in their lives. There is tension in living the contemplative life in Christ and the active life in Christ. Tension between growing in Christ and living for Christ is experienced by followers of Christ and I suggest that there is a biblical solution for resolving this tension through a persistent devoted nature.

Mulholland suggests tension is natural and is like breathing in and breathing out. Humans are created to do both. “There are not three classes of humans: ‘breathers in,’ ‘breathers out,’ and ‘breathers in and out.’ Healthy physical life requires a synergy of breathing in and out.”[1] Healthy spiritual formation is only possible if there is direct connection between growing in Christ and serving the purpose of Christ. “Spiritual formation is a process of being conformed to the image of Christ for the sake of others.”[2] The first followers of Jesus devoted themselves to learning of righteousness, fellowship with others, remembering Jesus, and submitting themselves to God in prayer for the benefit of growing inward and sharing the message that Jesus outward.  

Seeking to breathe in and breathe out my devoted life to Jesus. You know I love ya, Don


[1] M. Robert Mulholland. “Spiritual Formation in Christ and Mission with Christ” JSFSC 6 (2013), 11-17.

[2] M. Robert Mulholland Jr. Invitation to a Journey: A Road Map for Spiritual Formation. (Downers Grove, IL: Intervarsity Press, 1993), 12.

No comments: